The Ultimate List of All Moons of Jupiter [All 79 Explained]

Moons of Jupiter

After looking at the most giant planet in the solar system, Jupiter, its time we dive deeper to see the diverse moon system of the planet which as of 2019 ranks at the second position in the solar system after Saturn for the number moons it has.


If you haven’t already read the article on Jupiter – The Solar System Giant, I recommend you to do so.

You must have heard of some of the popular moons of Jupiter like Ganymede, Io, Europa, Callisto. Those moons were discovered by Galileo in 1610. But, do you know how many moons does Jupiter have in total?

There are a whopping 79 moons orbiting Jupiter.

And of course, this number can increase in the future. Who knows, maybe one day Jupiter will gain back its title for holding the most number of moons.

The sizes of the moons vary widely with Galileans moons being the biggest. Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system it is bigger than Mercury and Pluto. There are also some moons whose diameter barely exceeds 1 km.

Jupiter’s moons are divided into two main categories:

1] Regular satellites

2] Irregular satellites

Regular satellites are further divided into:-

i) Inner satellites or Amalthea group

These satellites orbit very close to Jupiter.

ii) Main Group or Galilean moons

Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. They are respectively the fourth-, sixth-, first-, and third-largest natural satellites in the Solar System.

What’s surprising is that Every Galilean Moon has a unique feature that marks it exceptional in the entire solar system.

Irregular satellites are further divided into:-

i) Prograde satellites

These moons orbit in the same direction as Jupiter.

ii) Retrograde satellites

These moons orbit opposite to the direction of Jupiter.

We will briefly go through every moon one by one. This is going to be a long but interesting read. So buckle up.

Note: ‘–‘ means no data is available.

Inner Satellites

1] Metis

Innermost moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA/JPL

Metis is the innermost moon of Jupiter.  It was discovered in 1979 in images taken by Voyager 1.

Metis is named after the first wife of Zeus.

The surface of Metis is heavily cratered, dark, and appears to be reddish in color. 

  • Discovered: 1979
  • Diameter: 43km
  • Orbital Period: 7 hours 10 minutes
  • Mass: 3.6 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 123K
  • Surface Gravity: –

2] Adrastea

Andrastea moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA/Cornell University

Adrastea is the smallest moon in this group.

Adrastea was discovered in 1979 by Voyager 1 making it the first satellite to be discovered by an interplanetary man-made object.

Adrastea is named after the foster mother of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 1979
  • Diameter: 16.4
  • Orbital Period: 7 hours 15 minutes
  • Mass: 0.2 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 122K
  • Surface Gravity: –

3] Amalthea

Amalthea, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA

Amalthea is the third closest moon to Jupiter and was the fifth moon of the Jupiter to be discovered.

It was discovered in 1892 by Edward Emerson Barnard.

Amalthea is named after a naiad who nursed the newborn Jupiter (Zeus). 

  • Discovered: 1892
  • Diameter: 167 km
  • Orbital Period: 11 hours 57 minutes
  • Mass: 208 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 120K
  • Surface Gravity:  0.020 m/s2

4] Thebe

Thebe, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA/JPL

Thebe is the second largest inner satellite.

It was discovered on 5 March 1979 by Stephen Synnott.

Thebe is the planet’s seventh-largest moon, with a mean radius of about 49 km.

Thebe is named after a nymph who was a love of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 1979
  • Diameter: 98.6 km
  • Orbital Period: 16 hours 11 minutes
  • Mass: 43 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity:  0.013 m/s2

Main Group/ Galilean Moons

5] Io

Moon of Jupiter Io

Io is the fourth-largest moon in the solar system and the third largest Galilean moon.

Io was discovered on Jan. 8, 1610 by Galileo Galilei.

Io is the most geologically active object in the solar system with over 400 active volcanos.

It has a very thin atmosphere primarily made of sulfur dioxide.

Io’s volcanos are at times so powerful that they are seen with large telescopes on Earth.

Io is named after a mortal woman who transformed into a cow during a marital dispute between the Greek god Zeus- Jupiter in Roman mythology.

  • Discovered: 1610
  • Diameter: 3,643.2 km
  • Orbital Period: 1.7 Earth days
  • Mass: 8931900 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 110K
  • Surface Gravity:  1.796 m/s2

6] Europa

Europa, moon Of Jupiter

Europa is the sixth-largest moon in the solar system and the smallest of the four Galilean moons.

Europa was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei.

According to the book written by The University of Arizona Space Science, Europa’s surface is mostly water ice, and beneath the ice is an ocean of liquid water.

Europa is about 90% the size of Earth’s moon but brighter.

Europa is named after the Phoenician mother of King Minos of Crete and lover of Zeus (the Greek equivalent of the Roman god Jupiter).

  • Discovered: 1610
  • Diameter: 3,121.6 km
  • Orbital Period: 3.5 Earth days
  • Mass: 4800000 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 102K
  • Surface Gravity:  1.314 m/s2

7] Ganymede

Ganymede, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA/JPL

Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system and the ninth-largest object.

Ganymede was discovered by Galileo Galilei.

It is the only moon with its own magnetic field.

Ganymede is 8% larger than Mercury.

It is named after the cupbearer of Greek gods who were carried to Olympus by Zeus.

  • Discovered: 1610
  • Diameter: 5,262.4 km
  • Orbital Period: 7.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 14819000 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 110K
  • Surface Gravity:  1.428 m/s2

8] Callisto

Callisto, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA/JPL/DLR(German Aerospace Center)

Callisto is the second-largest moon of Jupiter and third largest in the solar system after Ganymede and Saturn’s Titan.

Callisto like other Galilean moons were discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610.

It is the most heavily cratered object in the solar system.

Callisto has an extremely thin atmosphere made up of Carbon dioxide.

It is named after a woman who was turned into a bear by Zeus. Now that’s weird.

  • Discovered: 1610
  • Diameter: 4,820.6 km
  • Orbital Period: 16.68 Earth days
  • Mass: 10759000 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 134K
  • Surface Gravity:  1.235 m/s2

Prograde satellites

9] Themisto

Themisto, moon of Jupiter
Source: IMCCE (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides) / University of Hawaii [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/fr/deed.en)]

Themisto is the first of the many Prograde satellites of Jupiter. It was discovered in 1975, subsequently lost, and rediscovered in 2000.

It travels in the same direction as Jupiter’s rotation (a prograde orbit).

Themisto is named after the river god Inachus and the lover of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 1975
  • Diameter: 8 km
  • Orbital Period: 130 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.069 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity:  0.003 m/s2

10] Leda

Leda was discovered on Sept. 14, 1974, by Charles Thomas Kowal on plates taken from Sept. 11 through 13, 1974.

Leda was named for a woman in Greek mythology. According to one legend, she was seduced by Zeus.

  • Discovered: 1974
  • Diameter: 16 km
  • Orbital Period: 241 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.6 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity:  0.0073 m/s2

11] Himalia

Himalia, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA

Himalia is the fifth largest satellite of Jupiter only behind the four Galilean moons.

Himalia was discovered on 3 December 1904 by Charles Dillon Perrine.

It is named after a nymph who was one of the lovers of Zeus. She bore him three sons: Spartaeus, Cronios, and Cytus.

  • Discovered: 1904
  • Diameter: 170 km
  • Orbital Period: 251 Earth days
  • Mass: 670 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.062m/s2

12] Ersa

Ersa was discovered in 2017 and was announced in July 2018.

It is named after the Greek goddess of dew, the daughter of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 252 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity:  -

13] Pandia

Pandia was discovered in 2017 and was announced in July 2018.

It is named after the Greek goddess of the full moon, the daughter of Zeus and sister of Ersa.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 252.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

14] Lysithea

Lysithea moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA

Lysithea was discovered on July 6, 1938, by Seth Barnes Nicholson with the 100-inch (2.5 m) Hooker telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory.

Lysithea is named after the daughter of Oceanus and of Zeus’ lovers.

  • Discovered: 1938
  • Diameter: 36 km
  • Orbital Period: 259 Earth days
  • Mass: 6.3 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.013 m/s2

15] Elara

Elara, moon of Jupiter
Source: I, Kevin Heider [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]

Elara is the eighth largest moon of Jupiter. It was discovered on 19 January 5, 1905, by Charles Dillon Perrine.

Elara is named after Zeus’ lovers and the mother of giant Tityos.

  • Discovered: 1905
  • Diameter: 86 km
  • Orbital Period: 260 Earth days
  • Mass: 87× 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.031 m/s2

16] Dia

Dia was discovered in 2000 by S.S. Sheppard, D.C. Jewitt, Y. Fernandez, and G. Magnier using the University of Hawaii’s 2.2 m (88 inches) telescope atop Mauna Kea.

The moon was then lost in Jupiter’s bright glare for several years. Dia was rediscovered in images obtained by the Magellan Telescope in 2010 and 2011.

Dia is a Greek name meaning “she who belongs to Zeus”. Dia is the daughter of the seashore.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 274 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity:  -

17] Carpo

Carpo was discovered on Feb. 26, 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard and others from the University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy.

It is Jupiter’s most distant known moon with a prograde orbit.

Carpo is named after one of the daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 458.6 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

18] Valetudo

This tiny 1 km moon was discovered in 2016 but the discovery was announced in 2018.

It is a prograde moon but it crosses path with several retrograde moons and may collide with them in the future.

Valetudo is named after the goddess of health and hygiene who was also Jupiter’s great-granddaughter.

  • Discovered: 2016
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 533.3 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0001 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface gravity:

Retrograde satellites

19] S/2003 J12

S/2003 is one of the smallest satellites in the solar system. It is the innermost known retrograde satellite.  

It was discovered by a team of astronomers from the University of Hawaii led by Scott S. Sheppard in 2003.

The moon has not been seen its discovery in 2003 and is currently considered lost.

The name “S/2003 J12” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 12th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 490 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity:  -

20] Euporie

Euporie was discovered on Dec. 11, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Euporie is named after the Greek goddess of abundance who was the daughter of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 538.7 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

21] Eupheme

Eupheme was discovered Mar. 4, 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii, and originally designated S/2003 J3. It was lost after its discovery but was rediscovered in 2017.

In mythology, Eupheme is the spirit of praise and good omen, the granddaughter of Zeus, and the sister of Philophrosyne.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 584 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

22] S/2003 J18

S/2003 J18 was discovered in April 2003 by Brett Joseph Gladman at the Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii. The moon was lost following its discovery in 2003 and was rediscovered in 2017.

S/2003 J18 was so designated because it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 and was the 18th satellite of Jupiter (J) to be found that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 598 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

23] S/2010 J10

S/2010 J10 was discovered in 2010 by Christian Veillet.

It was labeled the smallest known moon in the solar system to have been found from Earth.

The name “S/2010 J10” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2010 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 10th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2010
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 588.82 Earth days
  • Mass: – 0.0001 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

24] Thelxinoe 

Thelxinoe was discovered on Feb. 9, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard and Brett J. Gladman at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Thelxinoe was named for one of the Muses, who were daughters of Zeus.  Thelxinoe means charm.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 628 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

25] Euanthe

Euanthe was discovered on Dec. 11, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is named after the mother of Graces.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 620 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

26] Helike

Helike was discovered on Feb. 6, 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is named after one of the nymphs who nurtured Zeus in his infancy.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 626 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

27] Orthosie

Orthosie was discovered in 2001 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is named after a Greek goddess of prosperity.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 623 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

28] S/2017 J7

This tiny moon of Jupiter was first spotted in 2017. The discovery announcement was made in July 2018.

The name “S/2017 J7” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 7th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 602.6 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

29] S/2016 J1

S/2016 J1 was discovered in 2016 by  Scott S. Sheppard.

The name “S/2016 J1” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2016 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 1st satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2016
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: –
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

30] S/2017 J3

This tiny moon of Jupiter was first spotted in 2017. The discovery announcement was made in July 2018.

The name “S/2017 J3” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 3rd satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 605.7 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: -

31] Locaste

Locaste was discovered Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The satellite appears grey in color.

Locaste is named after the mother/wife of Oedipus.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 5 km
  • Orbital Period: 632 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.019 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

32] S/2003 J16

S/2003 J16 was discovered in April 2003 by Brett J. Gladman at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The name “S/2003 J16” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 16th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

This moon is currently considered lost. It was last seen in April 2017.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 616 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: -

33] Praxidike

Praxidike was discovered on Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is grey in color.

Praxidike is named after the Greek goddess of justice or punishment.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 7 km
  • Orbital Period: 625 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.043 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity:  0.003 m/s2

34] Harpalyke

Harpalyke was discovered Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is colored gray similar to Praxidike and Iocaste.

Harpalyke is named after one of the lovers of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 623 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.012 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity:  0.002 m/s2

35] Mneme

Mneme was discovered on Feb. 9, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard and Brett Joseph Gladman at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Mneme was named for one of the Muses, who were daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 620 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

36] Hermippe

Hermippe moon of Jupiter
Source: Scott S. Sheppard and University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy (IfA) [Public domain]

Hermippe was discovered on Dec. 9, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is named after a lover of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 634 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

37] Thyone

Thyone was discovered on Dec. 11, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named in August 2003 after Thyone, better known as Semele, mother of Dionysus in Greek mythology.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 627 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

38] S/2017 J9

This tiny moon of Jupiter was first spotted in 2017. The discovery announcement was made in July 2018.

The name “S/2017 J9” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 9th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 639.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

39] Anake

Ananké, moon of Jupiter
Source: OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence) / CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique) / IMCCE (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides) [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/fr/deed.en)]

Ananke was discovered on Sept. 28, 1951, by Seth Barnes Nicholson.

Ananke is the largest member of the Ananke group.

Anake is named after the mother of Moirai.

  • Discovered: 1951
  • Diameter: 28 km
  • Orbital Period: 630 Earth days
  • Mass: 3 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124 K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.01 m/s2

40] Herse

Herse was discovered on Feb. 27, 2003, by Brett J. Gladman, John J. Kavelaars, Jean-Marc Petit, and Lynne Allen.

Herse is named after the daughter of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 734 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

41] Aitne

Aitne was discovered on 9 December 2001 by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Aitne is a member of the Carme group which orbits Jupiter in the opposite direction from the planet’s rotation.

It is named after the divine personification of Mount Etna.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 730 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

42] S/2017 J6

S/2017 J6 was discovered in 2017 and the discovery was announced in 2018.

The name “S/2017 J6” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 6th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 684 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

43] S/2011 J1

S/2011 J1 was discovered by Scott Shepard in 2011. The moon was lost after its discovery in 2011 and was rediscovered in September 2018.

The name “S/2011 J1” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2011 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 1st satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2011
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 694.98 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

44] Kale

Kale was discovered in 2001 by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Kale means ‘beautiful’ who is one of the daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 685 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

45] Taygete

Taygete was discovered Nov. 25, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named in October 2002 after Taygete, one of the Pleiades, daughter of the Titan Atlas and mother of Lacedaemon by Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 5 km
  • Orbital Period: 732 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.016 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

46] S/2003 J19

S/2003 J19 was discovered in February 2003 by Brett J. Gladman at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The moon was lost following its discovery in 2003 but was rediscovered in 2018.

The name “S/2003 J19” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 19th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 699.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

47] Chaldene

Chaldene is an irregular moon discovered by Scott Sheppard in 2000.

It is named after the mother of Solymos.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 699.3 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0075 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

48] Philophrosyne

Philophrosyne was discovered in April 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

In Greek mythology, Philophrosyne is a spirit of welcome and kindness and is the granddaughter of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 699.676 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

49] S/2003 J10

S/2003 J10 was discovered in February 2003 by Scott Sander Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The moon hasn’t been seen since its discovery and is considered lost.

The name “S/2003 J10” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 10th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 700.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

50] S/2003 J23

s/2003 J23, moon of Jupiter
Source: [Scott S. Sheppard]

S/2003 J23 was discovered in 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The moon hasn’t been seen since its discovery and is considered lost.

The name “S/2003 J23” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 23rd satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 700.5 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

51] Erinome

Erinome was discovered on Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named in October 2002 after the mythological Erinome, said to be a “daughter of Celes, compelled by Venus to fall in love with Jupiter.”

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 711.9 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

52] Aoede

Aoede was discovered Feb. 8, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan T. Kleyna, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Henry H. Hsieh at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Aoede was named for one of the Muses, who were daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 714.6 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

53] Kallichore

Kallichore was discovered on Feb. 6, 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Kallichore is named after a nymph who was one of the daughters of Jupiter.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 717.8 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

54] S/2017 J5

S/2017 J5 was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017.

The name “S/2017 J5” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 5th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 723.8 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

55] S/2017 J8

S/2017 J8 was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017.

The name “S/2017 J8” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 8th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 720.7 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

56] Kalyke

Kalyke was discovered on Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named in October 2002 after the Greek mythological figure Kalyke or Calyce.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 5 km
  • Orbital Period: 721 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.019 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002 m/s2

57] Carme

Carmé, moon of Jupiter
Source: OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence) / CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique) / IMCCE (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides) [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/fr/deed.en)]

Carme was discovered on July 30, 1938, by Seth Barnes Nicholson.

Carme group is named after Carme since it is the largest satellite in the group.

It received its present name in 1975 before it was simply known as Jupiter XI.

Carme is named for the mother of Britomartis by the Roman god Jupiter.

  • Discovered: 1938
  • Diameter: 46 km
  • Orbital Period: 702.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 13 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.017 m/s2

58] Callirrhoe

Callirrohoe, moon of Jupiter
Source: NASA

Callirrhoe was discovered Oct. 19, 1999, via the 36-inch telescope on Kitt Peak, in the course of observations by the Spacewatch program of the University of Arizona by Jim V. Scotti, Timothy B. Spahr, Robert S. McMillan, Jeffrey A. Larsen, Joe Montani, Arianna E. Gleason, and Tom Gehrels.

Callirrhoe is one of the faintest objects in the solar system. It is even fainter than dwarf planet Eris which is the farthest object known to us in the solar system. Jupiter is 2.5 billion times brighter than Callirrhoe.

It was named after the daughter of the river god, Achelous.

  • Discovered: 1999
  • Diameter: 9 km
  • Orbital Period: 758.8 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.087 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.003 m/s2

59] Eurydome

Eurydome was discovered on Dec. 9, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Eurydome was named after the mother of the Graces by Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 723.3 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

60] S/2017 J2

S/2017 J2 was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard and his team in 2017.

The name “S/2017 J2” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 2nd satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 723.8 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

61] Pasithee

Pasithee was discovered on Dec. 11, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named after Pasithee, one of the Charites, goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility, daughters of Zeus (Jupiter) by Eurynome.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 727.9 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

62] S/2010 J1

S/2010 J1 was discovered by R. Jacobson, M. Brozović, B. Gladman, and M. Alexandersen in 2010.

The name “S/2010 J1” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2010 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 1st satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2010
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 724.3 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

63] Kore

Kore was discovered on Feb. 8, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It was named after Kore, another name for the Greek goddess Persephone.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 723.7 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

64] Cyllene

Cyllene was discovered Feb. 9, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard and his team from the University of Hawaii at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Cyllene is named after one of the daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 731 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

65] S/2011 J2

S/2011 J2 was discovered in 2011 by Scott S. Sheppard.

The moon was lost following its discovery in 2011 but was rediscovered in 2017.

When discovered it was the 67th moon of Jupiter.

The name “S/2011 J2” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2011 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 2nd satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2011
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 731.3 Earth hours
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

66] Eukelade

Eukelade was discovered on Feb. 6, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

It is named after one of the daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 735.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

67] 2017 J1

S/2017 J1 was discovered in 2017.

The name “S/2017 J1” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2017 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 1st satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2017
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 734.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

68] S/2003 J4

S/2003 J4 was discovered in 2003 by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan T. Kleyna, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Henry H. Hsieh at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The name “S/2003 J4” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 4th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 739.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

69] Pasiphae

Pasiphaé, moon of Jupiter
Source: OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence) / CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique) / IMCCE (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides) [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/fr/deed.en)]

Pasiphae was discovered on Jan. 27, 1908, by Philibert Jacques Melotte with the Greenwich Observatory’s 30-inch Cassegrain telescope.

It is the largest member of the Pasiphae group.

Pasiphae is the largest retrograde and third-largest irregular satellite after Himalia and Elara.

Pasiphae was named in 1975 after the wife of Minos.

  • Discovered: 1908
  • Diameter: 60 km
  • Orbital Period: 764 Earth days
  • Mass: 30 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.022 m/s2

70] Hegemone

Hegemone was discovered on Feb. 8, 2003, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan T. Kleyna, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Henry H. Hsieh at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Hegemone is named after one of the daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 745.5 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

71] Arche

Arche, moon of Jupiter
Source: Scott S. Sheppard

Arche was discovered Oct. 31, 2002, by Scott S. Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Arche was named for one of the Muses, who were daughters of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2002
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 746.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0045 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

72] Isonoe

Isonoe was discovered Nov. 23, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Isonoe is named after one of the 50 daughters of Danaus.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 3 km
  • Orbital Period: 751.6 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0075 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

73] S/2003 J9

S/2003 J9 was discovered in February 2003 by Scott Sander Sheppard Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

The name “S/2003 J9” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 9th satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

The moon hasn’t been seen since its discovery in 3003 and is considered lost.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 1 km
  • Orbital Period: 752.8 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

74] Eirene

Eirene was discovered in February 2003 by Scott Sander Sheppard at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

In mythology, Eirene is the goddess of peace and the daughter of Zeus and Themis.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 758.3 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

75] Sinope

Sinopé, moon of Jupiter
Source: OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence) / CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique) / IMCCE (Institut de mécanique céleste et de calcul des éphémérides) [CC BY-SA 2.0 fr (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/fr/deed.en)]

Sinope was discovered on July 21, 1914, by Seth Barnes Nicholson on photographic plates taken with the Lick Observatory’s 36-inch (0.9 meters) telescope.

Sinope was the outermost known moon of Jupiter until the discovery of Megaclite in 2000.

It is named after one of the nymphs in Greek mythology.

  • Discovered: 1914
  • Diameter: 38 km
  • Orbital Period: 724.1 Earth days
  • Mass: 7.5 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: 124K
  • Surface Gravity: 0.014 m/s2

76] Sponde

Sponde was discovered Dec. 9, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii

It is named after one of the Horae who was the daughter of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 771.6 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.001 m/s2

77] Autonoe

Autonoe was discovered Dec. 10, 2001, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, and Jan T. Kleyna at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Autonoe was named in August 2003 after the Greek mythological figure Autonoë, the conquest of Zeus.

  • Discovered: 2001
  • Diameter: 4 km
  • Orbital Period: 772.1
  • Mass: 0.0090 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002m/s2

78] Megaclite

Megaclite was discovered on Nov. 25, 2000, by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Eugene A. Magnier at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii.

Megaclite was named for one of the adulterous conquests of the Roman god Jupiter.

Megaclite is practically the farthest moon from Jupiter because the last moon in our list is currently considered lost.

  • Discovered: 2000
  • Diameter: 5 km
  • Orbital Period: 792.2 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.021 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: 0.002m/s2

79] S/2003 J2

S/2003 J2 was discovered in February or March 2003 at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii by Scott S. Sheppard, David C. Jewitt, Jan T. Kleyna, Yanga R. Fernandez, and Henry H. Hsieh.

S/2003 J2 is Jupiter’s outermost known moon.

This moon has not been seen since its discovery in 2003 and is currently considered lost.

The name “S/2003 J2” means that it is a satellite (S) that was discovered in 2003 orbiting Jupiter (J) and that it was the 2nd satellite of Jupiter discovered that year.

  • Discovered: 2003
  • Diameter: 2 km
  • Orbital Period: 981.5 Earth days
  • Mass: 0.0015 × 1016 kg
  • Surface Temperature: –
  • Surface Gravity: –

Wrapping Up

If you are still reading this, Kudos. It was really a long list. But 79 may not be a final number because there are so many small bodies hiding in the shadows of Jupiter which might be discovered in the future.

What do you think?

Will more Jupiter moons be discovered in the future?
Yes, very likely
No, I don’t think so

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